When payments misses a trick

I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve written about how innovation in payments must reduce the friction in the transaction process if it is to have any chance of succeeding and capturing the attention of consumers.

Apple Pay in-store generally meets this criteria, assuming your bank is signed up and you accept the usual contactless limit restriction of £30 (in the UK) in most stores. Once all the banks are signed up and the limit restriction is gone, Apple Pay will feel like a truly frictionless payment experience, especially using Apple Watch. A couple of weeks ago I got an insight into the future of in-store payment when I bought a MacBook Pro using my Apple Watch – an expensive test and even the Apple retail employee said it was a first for him!

Fill Up & GoLast week I signed up for Shell’s new Fill Up & Go payment app which allows you to pay for your fuel at the pump using your iPhone. I duly downloaded the app, created the required two different Shell accounts (work that one out!) and added my PayPal credentials (that’s how the payment works). The process was awkward and fraught with errors and if I hadn’t been a dedicated payments professional I would have given up long before the end. However having eventually got there I jumped in the car and went to the local Shell station to buy some petrol. No QR codes in sight – apparently it’s not operational yet although the QR code was there in July and I have a photo to prove it. So not only a poor sign up process but also a failure to deliver at the point of sale. One bizarre point that caught my eye in the instructions is that apparently you have to remember to only scan the QR code on the pump from inside your car because you’re not allowed to use your phone outside your car (really!). What Shell ought to be doing is implementing Apple Pay at the pump – but then of course you’re not allowed to use your phone outside your car!

Before launching, payment providers need to step back and look at what their application actually means for consumers and whether it addresses the friction issue.