Apple Pay in the wild

Much has been written about the launch of Apple Pay in the UK; how it works, where you can use it, which cards are supported and so on. But what’s it like to use in the wild? Setup is very easy – especially if the card already stored in your Apple / iTunes account is issued by an Apple Pay partner. Adding additional cards involves snapping them with the iPhone camera, adding the CVV2 number and waiting for activation. A couple of times the card expiry dates were incorrectly recognised so one to watch before confirming card details. My American Express cards activated with no additional steps, my NatWest card required an additional authentication step via a code sent by SMS.

Using Apple Pay in-store is straightforward, especially with the iPhone. The Apple Watch is a little tricky as there’s a knack to twisting your wrist so the Watch face is over the contactless reader but you avoid smacking the face of the Watch on the reader and risking damage!

So what makes paying with Apple Pay better than just using a contactless card? Apart from the novelty value of paying with my Watch, there are two important elements for me.

Transactions are more secure – the retailer does not receive my card details so there’s no risk of them being stolen from compromised point of sale equipment or elsewhere. Each transaction is tokenised so there’s nothing useful to steal.

Realtime transaction alerts to monitor spending are important and can avoid later disputes. American Express already offers real time transaction alerts via iPhone Passbook notifications. Recently I was double charged in-store for a chip and PIN purchase; despite the terminal confirming the transaction was successful, the retailer assured me the till showed it hadn’t gone through so asked me to try again. I was able to show him a double transaction on my iPhone (and yes both transactions did settle later).

There’s still a long way to go with Apple Pay. Removing the £20 transaction limit and installing contactless readers in stores that typically process higher value transactions will massively increase the utility of Apple Pay as a payment method.

I’ve not yet had the opportunity to pay in-app – that’s my next challenge! Securing in-app card transactions, which are inherently susceptible to fraud via stolen card details, will be transformational in reducing online card fraud.

What sets Apple Pay apart from every other mobile or wearable device I’ve tried for payments is that it does feel it’s been designed with the consumer in mind.